Many students are thinking about the spring-times of their future careers, or summer jobs, or 'after school' jobs.

But with that thought comes anxiety:  as a home school grad, what do I put on my resume and what do I say in a job interview? What will I say when they ask “do you have your high school diploma?” I have some ideas…

(Note: this article isn’t a comprehensive list of everything you should put in a resume or say at an interview, but simply a few ideas for you to consider and get you thinking).

What's the difference?

"What's the difference between parent-led and teacher-led? Why do some families get different homeschool funding than others? I hear about 'aligned' or 'blended' or 'school-delivered' or 'teacher-led' or 'parent-led'... are there really that many kinds of home schooling?"

We hear questions like this frequently, and hope that the following information will help you to make an informed decision in your own educational journey. All learning-at-home options in Alberta fall under one of the following categories.

Top 10 Tips for Home Schooling Families On Simplifying Their Lives


1. Plan to do the most shopping and errands you can do on each shopping trip.  Avoid shopping more than once a week, if possible.  This will add time to your days.

2. Plan meals for 10 days to 2 weeks at a time, depending on your shopping schedule.  Know at breakfast (or even the night before!) what you are having for supper, so you can do the preparations needed during the day and not be wondering at 4 o’clock, “What’s for supper?”  This will also aid in nutrition and save you money!

3. Each family member should have a treasure box to keep their treasures inside.  Teach your children to de-clutter, too!  It will be a blessing to them throughout their lives.  Remember, “People are more important than things!”

Transcript of talk by tutor Ben van den Bosch given at WISDOM’s Great Books event, January 30th, 2016.

We asked WISDOM parents, students, facilitators, staff and Parent Advisory Council members to offer suggestions to the following question – how do we beat the January blues? Read on for many great ideas that have worked well in the homes of other home schoolers.

When I was a kid, we had screentime. Our device was a B&W TV with three channels and one was in French. If you’re sitting there wondering “what device is a B&W TV?” that’s because it was before your time, and if you’re nodding your head saying “Yeah I remember,” you are old… I mean, old-er. If you wanted to see a movie you had to go to the movie theater. That changed with the advent of new technology and what is called “user controlled content”.  User controlled content is where the individual using the device can control what they see and hear. With changing technology the user has gone from just simply using the device, to interacting with the device, and finally immersing themselves into the device. (I’ll clear things up later regarding the last one.)

Are you wondering what's new or what's coming up with WISDOM? Did you accidentally delete your e-Newsletter? No problem! Below, you can find a list of e-Newsletters from this school year:

If you'd like to receive our e-newsletter, please This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Games have been shown to give marked improvement in many cognitive functions. We have a list of recommended games, as well as what parts of the brain they 'exercise'. Bonus home school activity - your family won't even know they're learning.

Games That Build the Brain
by Therese McDonald

Did you hear about the mother who set her curriculum aside for one full year, and home schooled using board games (card games too)?   True story, and it turns out it was her best year ever.

It seems to me that home schooling is a lot like swimming across a lake.

When you are out in the middle, the lake sometimes seems to be a lot bigger than it looked when you jumped in, and unlike a swimming pool, it has no lines painted on the bottom to keep you swimming in a straight line. When you are fighting to make it through the waves without inhaling too much water, pushing yourself to keep going stroke after stroke when you are exhausted, and blinking to see in spite of the water stinging your eyes, it is possible to lose perspective.

How many containers do you need to fill a science program?  Peculiar question, huh?  Perhaps I should ask:  How many weekends does it take to fill your science program containers?